Economics

 PROGRAMMES OFFERED IN THE DEPARTMENT

  1. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D (Economics)
  2. Master of Philosophy (M.Phil.) (Economics)
  3. Master of Science (M.Sc.)  (Economics)
  4. Master of Science (M.Sc.) (Banking and Finance)
  5. Postgraduate Diploma (PGD)( Economics)
  6. Postgraduate Diploma (PGD)(Banking and Finance)

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Ph.D. Economics:Students are to enter the Ph.D. Programme on completion of a course-work-based Master degree programme in Economics (M.Sc. or M.Phil.) of the Benson Idahosa University or any other recognized university, with a minimum average score of 60%
  2. M.Phil. Economics: To be admitted into the M. Phil. degree programme in Economics, a candidate must have completed a master degree programme in Economics of Benson Idahosa University or any other recognized University and obtained an average score of not less than 55%.
  3. M.Sc Economics:  A good first degree in Economics obtained from Benson Idahosa University or any other recognized university. Candidates with Master degrees in related disciplines may also apply. Such other candidates will be required to produce their transcripts before processing their applications.
  4. M.Sc Banking and Finance: A good first degree in Economics, Business Administration, Banking & Finance, Accounting, or any other related discipline obtained from Benson Idahosa University or any other recognized university. Candidates with Master degrees in related disciplines may also apply. Candidates who had less than second class (lower division) in relevant disciplines in their first degree but who have obtained Postgraduate Diploma (PGD) in Banking and Finance of Benson Idahosa University with not less than credit pass and candidates with Higher National Diploma (HND) in related disciplines and who have obtained relevant professional qualification(s) may also apply.
  5. Postgraduate Diploma: The criteria for admission into the Post Graduate Diploma programmes in Economics and Banking and Finance will be as follows:
  • Candidates must have five credit passes including English and Mathematics at the ‘O’ level
  • Candidate with Bachelors degree of not less than 3rd class honour degree from an approved University
  • Candidate with HND and/or professional qualifications cognate to Economics from a recognized institution with not less than lower credit

DURATION OF PROGRAMMES

  1. PhD. Programme: The Ph.D programme is for a minimum of three (3) years. But for those admitted into the Ph.D programme with M. Phil degree in Economics from Benson Idahosa University or M. Phil. of any other BIU recognized institution, the minimum duration is two (2) years. The maximum duration for the Ph.D programme in Economics is six (6) years, after which the student will lose his/her studentship and will then be required to reapply or regularize the studentship in accordance with the University’s requirements for such regularization.
  2. M. Phil Programme: The M. Phil. programme is for a period of 24 months ( four semesters)
  3. M.Sc. Programmes:  The M.Sc. programmes are for a period of two (2) academic sessions. The maximum period allowed for M.Sc. programmes in the Department is four (4) academic sessions, after which the student may be asked to withdraw from the programme.
  4. PGD Programmes:   The programmes are offered for one academic session and up to one calendar year to complete the course work and a PGD Essay of not more than ten (10) thousand words. The PGD certificate candidate is allowed a maximum of twenty-four (24) months to complete the programme, after which he/she may be asked to withdraw from the programme.

Description of Courses PHD

ECO 911/921: Microeconomics I and II

Microeconomics is a two (2) semester course at this level. The principal objective of microeconomics at the Ph.D level is to provide the participating students with a comprehensive understanding of advanced microeconomic theory such that at the completion of the course, they are acquainted with the state of the art in microeconomic analysis. At the end of this course at this level, the students are expected to be able to apply microeconomic principles in the formulation and interpretation of economic policies as well as participate in public policy debates. The course is to undertake more advanced treatments of some selected topics from the M.Sc. level. The selected topics include advanced treatment of consumer theory – consumer choice and classical demand theory; theory of the firm;  principal-agent problem; theory of cots, production and profit maximization; market equilibrium and market failure; general equilibrium theory – existence, equilibrium and its welfare properties and the core theory; application of game theory to strategic market behaviour; market power; analysis of economic choice under uncertainty, economics of information and its implications for optimal decision making; theory of social choice; microeconomic theory of households and institutional economics.

ECO 912/922: Macroeconomics I and II 

Macroeconomics is also a two (2) semester course at this level. Topics to be covered include a review of basic macroeconomics models; the theory of aggregate consumption behaviour; the theory of investment; the labour market; money and financial markets; government sector, fiscal policy and the government budget constraint; inflation and expectations; open economy macroeconomics; theory and application of economic growth models; stabilization and adjustment policies; and special topics in macroeconomics.

ECO 913: Quantitative Methods

The course is designed principally to undertake an advanced treatment of mathematical economics. Topics to be examined include economic modelling; comparative-static analysis; optimization problems (including problems with equality constraints); dynamic analysis – economic dynamic and integral calculus, difference and differential equations (first and higher orders) and their applications in economics, simultaneous differential and difference equations; mathematical programming – linear (including duality) and non-linear with applications; game theory and its economic applications

 ECO 914: Trade Theories

The course will cover the following topics: a review of basic models of trade and empirical evidence; imperfect competition. Intra-industry trade and empirical evidence; international trade policy; trade policy and economic development; open economy accounting,

ECO 915: Monetary Economics

Topics include money in macro economy; the demand for money; the supply of money; money and inflation; central banking and monetary policy; financial institutions and financial intermediation; international financial institutions and policy; money in the open economy; and money and economic growth.

ECO 916: Public Sector Economics

Topics to be treated include overview of welfare economics; market failure; government failure; public expenditure theory; public enterprises; cost-benefit analysis and investment rules; theory of taxation; tax policy – overview of tax design; and public dept.

ECO 923: Econometrics

Topics include a quick survey of tools used on econometrics; basic and advanced results for the classical linear regression model; relaxing some assumptions of the classical linear regression model; topics in applied micro and macro economics; policy modelling applications in African countries.

 ECO 924: International Finance

Review of theories and models of foreign exchange rate determination; review of models, balance of payments adjustments; fiscal and monetary policy under fixed and flexible exchange rates; and international capital movement.

 ECO 925: Development Economics

This course at this level is to expose students to methodological and policy issues in Development economics. Emphasis will be on the appreciation of the controversies arising from the scope and methodologies of Development economics. The students are expected to have good background of economic theory to have good understanding of this course. Issues examined include Introduction – economics of development and development of economics; Theories of Development – the big push models, structuralist models, theories of dualism,etc; Growth models – static and endogenous; Peculiarities of African economies; Poverty, equity and growth; Agriculture and rural development; Stabilization, structural adjustment and debt problem; Trade and globalization; Institutions and development; Human capital issues; Environmental issues and development; Lessons from other developing areas; Special topics in development economics – conflict, HIV/AIDS, population, fertility and child labour, science, technology and development.

ECO 926: Environmental Economics

Topics include: environment and development; optimal utilization of environmental resources; environmental pollution; the valuation of environmental resources; policy options – market based instruments; and integrated management of environmental resources.

ECO 930: Dissertation

This is an original research in an area selected by the student which is expected to be in the student’s area of specialisation. Research is done under the supervision of professors in the area of research. Emphasis is on comprehensive literature review, solid theoretical formulation of hypothesis, empirical tests of hypothesis, definite and original contribution to knowledge.

 

Description of Courses for Masters in Economics

 ECO 811: Advanced Microeconomic Theory I (3 Credits)

It is the assumption of microeconomics course at the M.Sc. level that the students taking the course at that level have adequate knowledge of relevant topics in mathematical economics, particularly adequate knowledge about differential and integral calculus, set theory and linear algebra. This is required for the understanding of this course. This course provides a mathematical treatment of microeconomics. Topics examined in the first part of this course include consumer theory; theory of production and supply; theory of market structure; general equilibrium theory; game theory; economic choice under uncertainty. – utility maximization, demand theory, substitution and income effects, theory of revealed preference. The theory of the firm – basic concepts such as production function/product curves, elasticity of substitution, optimizing behaviour of firms, input demands, cost functions and joint products, homogenous production function, CES production functions, and the translog functions.

ECO 812: Advanced Macroeconomic Theory I (3 Credits)

This course includes an advanced treatment of the theory of aggregate output, employment and the value of money with special reference to the General Theory of J.M. Keynes. Emphasis is put on the analysis both of the short term and long run fluctuations in the growth of output. The divergence between the Classical and Modern postulations on consumption and money is stressed

ECO 813:  Mathematics for Economics (3 Credits)

The course examines the application of mathematical principles in economics. Topics covered are mathematical vs non-mathematical economics, growth mathematics; set theory; geometry and trigonometry with applications; linear and matrix algebra with applications; dynamics; calculus – differential and integral calculus; static (equilibrium) analysis; comparative- static analysis; optimization – static and dynamic; including free and constrained optimization problems; dynamic analysis; economic dynamics; first and higher order differential and difference equations with applications; logarithmic and exponential functions; linear economic models; linear programming and its applications; input-output analysis. The link between mathematical, statistical and econometric analyses will also be examined.

ECO 814: Econometrics (3 Credits)

This course deals with how econometric methods relate to applied work. The topics include a review of basic concepts in econometrics, and the classical linear regression model; Estimation of Econometrics Models; Simultaneous Equation Models ; distributed lag models ; Linear Stationary Time Series Models , Linear Non-Stationary Time Series Models ; Models with Variable Conditional Variances, Panel Data Econometrics;  Probit and Logit Models,  Quality Response Models, Discrete Choice Models; Censored Regression models; Duration Models. This course deals with how econometric methods relate to applied work. Emphasis is on the inter-play of economic theory and econometric methods.

ECO 821: Advanced Microeconomic Theory II (3 Credits)

This is a continuation of ECO 811. Topics covered include the Kuhn-Tucker conditions; market equilibrium–commodity market equilibrium, factor market equilibrium, dynamic equilibrium; topics in information economics; welfare economics and social choice; public goods, externalities and market failure; market structure; property right; household behavior; microeconomics of corruption and conflict

ECO 822: Advanced Macroeconomic Theory II (3 Credits)

The course also covers discussions of the relation of Keynesian to other schools of thought together with recent developments and controversies, including detailed analysis of some post-Keynesian developments and their implications for economic policy. Contributions on the empirical side that throw light on theoretical controversies are also examined.

ECO 823: Research Methodology   ( 3 Credits)

ECO 824: Entrepreneurship ( 3 credits)

ECO 831: History of Economic Thought (3 Credits)

The study of economic thought takes an in-depth analysis of various stages of the development of economic philosophy. It x-rays the great works of scholars in the field of economic thought who have influenced the evolution of economic philosophy over the years. The curse will cover specific periods, including the Greeks era (the works of Plato, Aristotle); the Roman period; the Middle Ages; Mercantilism; Physiocrats; Adam Smith and the classical world, including David Ricardo, Karl Marx, the Marginalists, the Lausanne School, Thorstein Veblen, Alfred Marshall, Keynes, etc.

ECO 832: Project Analysis and Evaluation

ECO 833: International Trade (3 Credits)

Topics to be covered include the classical and modern theories of trade: perfect competition models of trade; imperfect competition models of trade, international trade policy; and trade policy and economic development.

ECO 834: Monetary Theory and Policy I (3 Credits)

This course deals with an advanced treatment of the role of money in the classical Keynesian and monetarist models: Introduction: Issues in Monetary economics; The Demand for Money, The Supply of Money; Money and Price level; Central Banking and Monetary Policy.

ECO 835 – Concepts and Theories of Development

Review of approaches to the study of development; the economics of growth; income distribution, poverty and growth; the economics of population and development; agricultural stagnation, agrarian structure and the green revolution; theories of growth and development; labour markets in developing countries; migration; rural land markets; rural financial markets; education, human capital and development; risk and insurance markets; gender and development; governance and development; international trade and development; MDGs;

 

ECO 836 – Problems and Policies of Development

Objectives of macroeconomic policy; rationale for development policy; policy issues; economic policies – fiscal, monetary, income, exchange rate, etc; economic reforms in Africa, in general and Nigeria, in particular; concepts and rationale for development planning; types of planning; development policy models and techniques; rise and fall of planning. Emphasis will be placed on an analysis of Nigeria’s development efforts in the context of her domestic and international socio-economic policies, problems and practices. Economic financial and social implications of development programmes, policies and practices in Nigeria will be highlighted.


 

 ECO 837 – Public Finance     

The course will cover topics such as: Overview of Welfare Economics; Market Failure and the Rationale for Government Intervention; Public Expenditure Theory (Resource Allocation Mechanism, Public Choice Theory, Theories of Public Expenditure Growth, Public Expenditure Policy in Africa, Public Enterprise Pricing); Cost Benefit Analysis and Investment Rules, Government Failure, etc.

ECO 838 – Monetary Theory and Policy   

The course will cover topics such as: Financial Institutions and Financial Intermediation; Financial Development and Economic Development; Money in the Open Economy; Money and Economic Growth; International Financial Institutions and Policy, condition for general equilibrium in the money market, monetary policy and internal and external balances

 

ECO 839 – Industrial Economics I

The main thrust of industrial economics involves the application of microeconomic theories to the analysis of firms, markets and industries. Topics to be covered include the theoretical foundation of industrial economics; approaches to industrial economics; role of industry in economic development; the structure-conduct-performance paradigm; theory of the firm; Market concentration; advertising; market structure; game theory; barriers to entry; research and development; international trade; financial market; mergers and joint ventures; vertical and horizontal integration. Further analysis of industrial structure, conduct and performance; analysis of firm structure and behaviour; industrial policy and industrialization strategies; impact of stabilization and structural adjustment programmes on industry in a developing country; impact of poverty and the new initiatives on industrialization in Africa.

                  

ECO 841: International Finance (3 Credits)

Financial aspects of International trade flows. Topics covered include: Open economy accounting; foreign exchange markets and international parity conditions; models of balance of payments adjustment; theories of models of exchange rate determination; open economy macroeconomics – fiscal and monetary policy under different exchange rate regimes; international capital movements.

ECO 842 – Economic Planning         

 

ECO 843 – Taxation and Fiscal Policy

Theory of Taxation (Overview of a good tax system, The Incentive Effects of Taxation, The Incentive Effects of Taxation, Theory of Optimal Taxation); Tax Policy (Tax design and structure, Tax Administration, Tax reforms); Inter-Governmental Fiscal Relations (Principles of intergovernmental Relations. Assignment of Functions: Expenditure and Tax Assignments. Revenue Sharing Mechanisms/Intergovernmental grants and transfers: The African Experience); Public Debt (Domestic and external debt: Causes, management and Financing. Overview of External debt in Africa and HIPC initiatives).

ECO 844 – Industrial Economics II

This is a continuation of industrial economics I. This second part of this course focuses on the analysis of some applied areas of the subject. Topics examined include productivity and efficiency analysis; privatization and commercialization; globalization and regional integration; public regulation; development strategies; technological capabilities; industrial policy

 

ECO 845 – Environmental Economics I

Basic issues in environmental economics – scope and nature of environmental economics). The environment and economic development; The Economics of Natural Resource Extraction and Management (Taxonomy of natural resources and challenges in their management, Dynamic optimization, Non-renewable resources, Renewable resources); Natural resource accounting (Natural resource accounting; theory, Natural resource accounting; practices, Examples of green national accounts from Africa).

 

ECO 846 – Operations Research

 

ECO 851 – Logistics and Supply Chain Management

 

ECO 852 – Environmental Economics II

Public goods and externalities; environmental valuation and analysis – Value and welfare; ENVIRONMENTAL VALUATION TECHNIQUES (with at least one mandatory empirical assignment); environmental policy instruments (Market based Instruments, Regulations and Standards, Property Rights Reform, Selection of Policy instruments and mixed instruments, and waste management).

ECO 853 – Petroleum Economics    

An explanatory and descriptive analysis of the theories and trends in choices and decision-making related to the use of capital, labour and land, technology and management of resources in Nigeria’s petroleum industry as a means of providing guidance for a more effective and efficient use of Nigeria’s petroleum reserves. Other topics include politics and strategies of government, private national and international institutions and agencies in the petroleum industry. A cost-benefit analysis of (a) Naira Investment (b) Security risks and (c) Environment degradation entailed in various types, perspective and forms of petroleum and energy resources use. Three broad perspectives will be highlighted. (1) Industry with emphasis on provision of more reliable impossibly cheaper energy (2) government with emphasis on provision of relevant sets of incentives and regulation, sales and utilization of Nigeria’s energy resources (3) academic with emphasis on provision of enlightened guide for society’s choice which transcends narrowly defined ends in line with current global energy picture.

ECO 854 – Advanced Econometrics

 

ECO 855 – Mathematical Economics

 

ECO 830: Thesis ( 6 Credits)

The candidate is required to write a thesis of not more than twenty-five (25) thousand words in any area of his/her choice. The thesis which should be empirical in nature is expected to depict the demonstration of the student’s knowledge of economic

 

Description of Courses Banking and Finance

BBF 811: Microeconomic Analysis

This course provides a relatively advanced treatment of topics in Microeconomic Theory; demand, supply and price elasticity, consumer theory, Theory of the firm, cost and production functions, constrained and unconstrained optimization, The C-D and Elasticity of Substitution Production functions

BBF 812: Quantitative Methods

The course consists of three components – mathematics for economists, statistical inference and econometrics. Topics covered are: set theory and trigonometry, linear algebra, calculus, static optimization, dynamic optimization, dynamics, review of basic concepts in econometrics, and the classical linear regression model. O0ther topics to be covered in this course include: Methods of differential calculus – comparative static analysis and optimization techniques including free and constrained optimization problems, economic dynamics and integral calculus; first and higher order differential and difference equations with applications; logarithmic and exponential functions. It also includes a treatment of linear economic models and matrix algebra with applications

BBF 813:  Management of Banks

The course is designed to provide students with management techniques for effective and efficient operation of banking and non-banking financial institutions. Topics covered include: bank environments, functions of a bank and the banking system; banking market structure and the structure of banks; risks and returns in banking; the role of bank capital and adequacy; banks’ capital structure and management; assets-liability management with emphasis on deposit attraction, liquidity, profitability, lending, and investment and cash management practices. In-depth analysis of debt and portfolio selection of banking institutions. It covers their lending policies and procedures, with emphasis on compliance with regulations and guidelines; the treatment of doubtful and bad loans in the bank’s balance sheet; investment policies and procedures; credit analysis; bank performance analysis; banks capital regulation; general banking regulation, supervision: the role of disclosure in banking; new trends in banking (automation in banking such as automatic teller, automatic clearing house (ACH), and Electronic Funds Transfer System). Other topics include bank marketing and community relations, personnel policies in the bank, audit control.

BBF 814: Monetary Theory and Policy I

This course deals with an advanced treatment of the role of money in the classical Keynesian and monetarist models: Introduction: Issues in Monetary economics; The Demand for Money, The Supply of Money; Money and Price level; Central Banking and Monetary Policy. Financial Institutions and Financial Intermediation; Financial Development and Economic Development; Money in the Open Economy; Money and Economic Growth; International Financial Institutions and Policy; condition for general equilibrium in the money market, monetary policy and internal and external balances

BBF 821: Macroeconomic Analysis

An advanced treatment of the theory of aggregate output, employment and the value of money with special reference to the General Theory of J.M. Keynes. Emphasis is put on the analysis both of the short term and long run fluctuations in the growth of output. The course also covers discussions of the relation of Keynesian to other schools of thought together with recent developments and controversies, including detailed analysis of some post-Keynesian developments and their implications for economic policy. Contributions on the empirical side that throw light on theoretical controversies are also examined.

BBF 822: Management Information System

This course exposes the student the rapidly evolving trends in information systems; information management methods, internal control,; personnel and technological deployments, delivery and sales information; product costing and management, analysis of information systems designed for operational activities;  systems selection, project management, IT audit and governance, business continuity and disaster planning, and change management,  e-service quality in the financial services industry.

BBF 823: Research Methodology

BBF 824: Entrepreneurship

BBF 831: Advanced Banking Theory

Nigerian and international laws which govern the conduct of banking; laws of contract, negotiable instruments, surety ship and guarantees, administration of justice, real and personal property, bankruptcy, liquidations, banker-customer relationship, banking ethics; BOFID, NDIC, money laundering decrees, etc.

BBF 832: Financial Management

Topics to be covered include: Institutional Structure; (Domestic Money and Capital Markets, International Money and Capital Markets, and Money and Capital markets in Africa); Financial Assets (Primary Assets, Derivatives, and Hedging); Issuing and Trading of Financial Assets (How Firms Issue Assets, Primary and Secondary Markets); Valuation Principles (Time Value of Money, Net Present Value (NPV), Financial Statements and Cash Flow Analysis); Portfolio Theory (Risk and Return, Mean-Variance Analysis, Optimal Portfolios and Diversification, Asset Pricing Models: CAPM and APT); Short-term Financing (Cash and Credit Management, Lending and Borrowing); Development Finance (Market Imperfections, Policies to address, Capital Market Imperfections, and Micro-Credit).

BBF 833: Introductory Econometrics

BBF 834: Insurance and Pensions management

This course examines detailed treatment of topics in insurance. These topics include general insurance; risk and insurable interest; classes and types of risks and insurable interests; classes and types of insurance policies (including life policies); claims procedures; principle of average clause and subrogation; reinsurance; pension system; comparative pensions system; nature and forms of pensions of different countries; an overview of pension system in Nigeria;  pension reforms in Nigeria; regulatory framework of pensions in Nigeria; pension funds administration, investment and management. 

BBF 835: Mortgage Finance                               

The course will cover issues in mortgage finance, mortgage debt instruments as they relate to housing and economic development, maturity terms, processes and specialized mortgage programmes. The topics will include mortgage sector-initiated financial crisis, effects of contagion, Asset bubbles and “toxic” loans.

BBF 836: Agricultural Finance                            

BBF 840: Thesis

The candidate is required to write a thesis of not more than twenty (20) thousand words in any area of banking or finance. The thesis is expected to address current topical issues in banking or/and finance, particularly as they relate to Nigerian economy.     

BBF 841: Financial Markets and Institutions

Topics to examine include financial system and financial intermediation; structure of financial system – markets, institutions, instruments, regulatory agencies; capital market instruments and participants; capital market regulation; securities valuation and pricing; portfolio theory – capital-Asset pricing model (CAPM) and Arbitrage pricing theory; option pricing; capital market efficiency; primary assets and financial derivatives; international capital market.

BBF 842: Management Accounting

This course exposes the student to the principles of costing; internal use of accounting information by management for decision making, management functions in planning, operational activities, budgeting and variance analysis, capital investment appraisal and decisions under uncertainty, responsibility  accounting and management structure

BBF 843: International Banking and Finance

Advanced treatment of the nature, functions, and transactions in the FOREX, correspondence banking, international banking practices, international banking settlements, money transfers, forward and futures transactions, premiums, discounts, hedges, etc. Open economy accounting; foreign exchange markets and international parity conditions; models of balance of payments adjustment; theories of models of exchange rate determination; open economy macroeconomics – fiscal and monetary policy under different exchange rate regimes; international capital movements.

BBF 844: Global Marketing

This course deals with the movement from a domestic marketing situation to one that is Global in scope of transnational, and the uncertainties in the decision process. The course focuses on these marketing complexities. Topics include Global marketing perspectives, organizing and planning for Global marketing, Global market research, Global market entry and expansion, international advertising, international distribution considerations, licensing and franchising and managing change in Global marketing.

BBF 845: Marketing Management

This course covers the management of marketing strategies and programs; marketing planning, decision-making, and problem solving; demand generation, sales techniques, consumer behavior, bait and switch strategies, packaging, price discrimination, marketing intelligence, social and ethical issues in marketing vis-à-vis marketing plan formulation and implementation.

BBF 846: Trust Administration

Trusteeship law – appointment, duties, obligations, accounts and termination of trusts; executorship law, wills and letter of administration and probate; devolution of property; powers  and duties of executors and administrators; trust administration, establishment, processes and management in Nigeria.

 

Description of Courses for Economics(PGd.)

ECO 711: Microeconomic Theory (3 Credits)

The course covers microeconomic theory at a relatively advanced level.  Topics covered include Consumer theories; Cost and production function; Duality Theory; competition of firms; market failure; distribution theory;  general equilibrium theory and Welfare economics. Emphasis is on mathematical applications

BBF 711: Principles of Banking (3 Credits)

This course provides a combination of the practice and elements of banking in topics treated at a relatively advanced level; national and international banking practices, the NFS, CAMEL, role of banks, supervision and regulation, banking products, operational activities; negotiable instruments, bills of exchange, banking laws; CBN, NDIC, etc,

 

BBF 712: Bank Management I (3 Credits)

The course is designed to provide students with management techniques for effective and efficient operation of banking and non-banking financial institutions. Topics covered include: bank environments, functions of a bank and the banking system; banking market structure and the structure of banks; risks and returns in banking; the role of bank capital and adequacy; banks’ capital structure and management; assets-liability management with emphasis on deposit attraction, liquidity, profitability, lending, investment and cash management practices.

BBF 713: Monetary Theory and Policy (3 Credits)

This course deals with an advanced treatment of the role of money in the classical Keynesian and monetarist models: Introduction: Issues in Monetary economics; The Demand for Money, The Supply of Money; Money and Price level; Central Banking and Monetary Policy.

BBF 714: Corporate Finance and Investment (3 Credits)

Topics to be covered include: Institutional Structure; (Domestic Money and Capital Markets, International Money and Capital Markets, and Money and Capital markets in Africa); Financial Assets (Primary Assets, Derivatives, and Hedging); Issuing and Trading of Financial Assets (How Firms Issue Assets, Primary and Secondary Markets); Valuation Principles (Time Value of Money, Net Present Value (NPV), Financial Statements and Cash Flow Analysis); Portfolio Theory (Risk and Return, Mean-Variance Analysis, Optimal Portfolios and Diversification, Asset Pricing Models: CAPM and APT); Short-term Financing (Cash and Credit Management, Lending and Borrowing); Development Finance (Market Imperfections, Policies to address, Capital Market Imperfections, and Micro-Credit).

BBF 715: Research Methods (3 Credits)

The course teaches the student to identify research problems, plan, execute and evaluate the research problems and projects; scientific research, research processes, theoretical formulations, experimental designs and analysis; concept of definition, formulating hypotheses, validity, measurement and scaling methods, concepts and problems in data collection and sampling, causal inferences, study and control groups, report writing; drafting, reversing, proof reading, sharing/publication, reviews of write-ups, formatting, statistical inferences, regression analysis, ANOVA, and non-parametric techniques; chi-square, etc.

 

BBF 721: Macroeconomic Theory (3 Credits)

Topics covered include  models of income determination; Investment analysis; Government taxation and expenditure; Demand for money; supply of money; Monetary Equilibrium; Models of full employment; Stabilization policy; Rational expectations and the new Classical macroeconomics; . Aggregate Supply and Demand; the Pigou effects; Comparative static model of inflation; the external sector; internal and external equilibrium; dynamic Consumption function; the business cycle and stabilization policy; growth models and economic policies under alternative exchange rate regimes.

BBF 722: Bank Management II (3 Credits)

The course provides an in-depth analysis of debt and portfolio selection of banking institutions. It covers their lending policies and procedures, with emphasis on compliance with regulations and guidelines; the treatment of doubtful and bad loans in the bank’s balance sheet; investment policies and procedures; credit analysis; bank performance analysis; banks capital regulation; general banking regulation, supervision: the role of disclosure in banking; new trends in banking (automation in banking such as automatic teller, automatic clearing house (ACH), and Electronic Funds Transfer System). Other topics include bank marketing and community relations, personnel policies in the bank, audit control.

BBF 723     Marketing of Financial Services                                   

This course aims at providing students with detailed knowledge of marketing concepts as they apply to the marketing of financial products. Topics include an overview of marketing, and the marketing of financial services, financial market planning, marketing research, products and services development financial services delivery systems, advertising, public relations and relationship management, the art of personal selling and negotiations; ethics of financial marketing.

BBF 724     Comparative Banking System                                      

In this course, the students shall be exposed to the following topics. The structure, evolution, functions and regulatory framework of banking institutions in different countries and categories of countries compared and contrasted; market discipline and corporate governance, comparative analysis of the institution’s balance sheets structure and their sources and uses of fund, policy recommendations on some observed useful features in banking in some countries, case studies and banking in developing as well as developed countries, banking in Socialist, Capitalist, Mixed, Transitional and emerging economies.

 


 

BBF725      Microfinance                                                                 

The objective of the course is to provide students with concepts, knowledge and practice of micro and small enterprises finance with peculiar problems in obtaining loans from conventional financial institutions as well as management of their enterprises in Nigeria. Topics to be covered include the characteristics of micro and small business enterprises and their methods of sourcing funds include: Cooperative societies, individual’s partnerships and clusters of artisans, farmers, traders, associations, partnerships as well as small limited liability companies. The course places emphasis on the main principles and practice of universal methodologies of micro finance banking. Participatory loan administration, innovative group liability scheme, savings and loans products, micro leases, micro insurance, parameters for appraising and evaluating the dual or financial profitability and social missions. Others include micro enterprise marketing, relationship, risk and contemporary issues in small business finance in Nigeria.

BBF 730: Essay (3 Credits)

A long essay of not more ten (10) thousand words on any topical banking or finance issue. The essay is expected to contain some empirical analyses, although not as rigorous as that required from Masters students.